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Norman Regional Health System Physician Clinics | Endocrine Para/Thyroid Center

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Norman Regional's Endocrine Para/Thyroid Center is dedicated to the treatment of patients with endocrine-related diseases and disorders. The center has two endocrinologists, Drs. Lubna Mirza and Tan Pham, who specialize in the treatment of disorders involving the body's glands and the hormones they secrete. These conditions include diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and more.

Understanding Glands and Hormones

Adrenal

The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live without, including sex hormones and cortisol. Cortisol helps you respond to stress and has many other important functions.

With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones. In Cushing's syndrome, there's too much cortisol, while with Addison's disease, there is too little. Some people are born unable to make enough cortisol.

Causes of adrenal gland disorders include:

  • Genetic mutations
  • Tumors including pheochromocytomas
  • Infections
  • A problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland
  • Certain medicines
  • Treatment depends on which problem you have. Surgery or medicines can treat many adrenal gland disorders.

Pituitary

Your pituitary gland is a pea-sized gland at the base of your brain. The pituitary is the 'master control gland' - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. With pituitary disorders, you often have too much or too little of one of your hormones. Injuries can cause pituitary disorders, but the most common cause is a pituitary tumor.

Thyroid

Your thyroid is a small gland found at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. The thyroid produces two main hormones called T3 and T4. These hormones travel in your blood to all parts of your body. The thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities together are known as your body's metabolism. A thyroid that is working right will produce the right amounts of hormones needed to keep your body's metabolism working at a rate that is not too fast or too slow.

Parathyroid

Most people have four pea-sized glands, called parathyroid glands, on the thyroid gland in the neck. Though their names are similar, the thyroid and parathyroid glands are completely different. The parathyroid glands make parathyroid hormone (PTH), which helps your body keep the right balance of calcium and phosphorous.

If your parathyroid glands make too much or too little hormone, it disrupts this balance. If they secrete extra PTH, you have hyperparathyroidism, and your blood calcium rises. In many cases, a benign tumor on a parathyroid gland makes it overactive. Or, the extra hormones can come from enlarged parathyroid glands. Very rarely, the cause is cancer.

If you do not have enough PTH, you have hypoparathyroidism. Your blood will have too little calcium and too much phosphorous. Causes include injury to the glands, endocrine disorders, or genetic conditions. Treatment is aimed at restoring the balance of calcium and phosphorous. (NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease)

 

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Today we honor Toby Keith by raising a red solo cup to his legacy, not only in our community but around the world. A message from Richie Splitt: "It's with great sadness that I share the news that country music legend Toby Keith passed away yesterday at the age of 62 after his battle with stomach cancer. Born in Clinton and raised in Moore, Oklahoma, Keith was a towering figure in country music for over three decades, selling more than 40 million albums worldwide since his debut in 1993. Patriotic anthems like “American Soldier” and “Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue” struck a chord after 9/11, giving voice to the patriotic sentiment so many of us were feeling during one of the darkest periods in American history. Throughout his prolific career, Keith received many prestigious awards and was an active participant in local charities. Toby Keith embodied the Oklahoma spirit, remaining loyal to his deep roots in our great state. He was occasionally spotted walking the halls of Norman Regional Health System and was routinely seen cheering on the Oklahoma Sooners at sporting events. On behalf of all of us at Norman Regional, I extend our deepest condolences to Toby Keith's family, friends, fellow musicians, and millions of fans. His contributions to country music, our community and his generous spirit will not be forgotten. May he rest in peace. In honor of Toby Keith's extraordinary life and the joy he brought to countless fans, we will be introducing “red solo cups” to our cafeterias as a tribute to one of Oklahoma’s true icons. This symbolic addition will serve as a heartfelt gesture to celebrate the man who captured the spirit of community, patriotism and the love for life. Let us raise a cup in memory of Toby Keith, acknowledging the impact he made on the world of music and the pride he instilled in his home state of Oklahoma." Richie Splitt, President & CEO

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